Jan 31 2011

Imbolc: First Light in the Dark of Winter

(2 pm. – promoted by ek hornbeck)

Although you’d never know it if you looked out your window here in the Northeast and throughout a good part of the northern hemisphere, we are nearing the midpoint between winter solstice and the vernal equinox. The Sun is noticeably rising earlier and setting later. It is a pleasure to take my early morning shower in daylight and start dinner preparation with daylight still illuminating the kitchen. There are seed catalogs arriving in the mail which has me contemplating the flower beds, the herb garden and maybe this year some vegetables.

In the traditions of Pagan and Wiccan religions, we celebrate this changing season as Imbolc, or Candlemas, which begins on January 31st, February Eve, and ends on February 2nd, a time of rebirth and healing. Imbolc is one of the eight Wiccan Sabbats of the Wheel of the Year, one of the four cross-quarter fire festivals. Brighid, the patroness of poetry and healing, is the Pagan Goddess associated with Imbolc.

Some of the traditions are the lighting of fires, decorating with red and white symbolizing the snow and the rising sun and green for new growth. Candles are lit in all the rooms of the house. Fires places and hearths are cleaned out of ashes and fires are lit. Since there is still snow drifts in my backyard, the fireplace will be just fine.

The symbols are ewes and lambs since Imbolc is derived from a Celtic word, “oimelc”, meaning ewe’s milk. Many of the foods that are serves are lamb, cheese, poppyseed muffins, cakes and breads. Dishes are seasoned with bay leaves and dried basil.

In rural places where farming is still a way of life, ploughs are decorated with flowers and then doused with whiskey. I know most of us have better things to do with whiskey. Sometimes the plough is dragged from door to door by costumed children asking for food and money, a kind of wintry “trick or treat”. Some traditional gifts, if your going to a friends house to celebrate, are garden tools, seeds and bulbs.

The Maiden is also honored as the “Bride” on this Sabbat. Straw corn dollies are created from oat or wheat straw and placed in baskets with white flower bedding. The older women make special acorn wands for the dollies to hold. The wands are sometimes burned in the fireplace and in the morning, the ashes in the hearth are examined to see if the magic wands left marks as a good omen. A new corn broom is place by the front door to symbolize sweeping out the old and welcoming the new.

Non-Pagans celebrate February 2nd as Ground Hog’s Day, a day to predict the coming weather, telling us that if the Groundhog sees his shadow, there will be ‘six more weeks’ of bad weather. It actually has ancient roots, weather divination was common to Imbolc, and the weather of early February was long held to be a harbinger of spring. On Imbolc, the crone Cailleach‘s grip of winter begins to loosen. She goes forth in search of kindling so that she may keep her fires burning and extend the winter a little longer. If Imbolc is rainy and cloudy, she will find nothing but twigs unsuitable for burning and will be unable to prolong the winter. If the day is dry and kindling is abundant, she will have plenty of fuel to feed her fire and prolong the cold of winter. Spring will be very far away. As an old British rhyme tells us that, “If Candlemas Day be bright and clear, there’ll be two winters in the year.”

Whatever you celebrate or believe, let us all hope that that the local groundhog doesn’t see his shadow and there is only one winter this year. I have nowhere else to pile the snow.

Blessed Be.


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  1. TMC
  2. Translator, aka Dr. David W. Smith

    and am glad that this is so.  It looks like we here in the Bluegrass are going to dodge the really nasty storm that is gathering, so I think that I will go out tomorrow and burn some of the downed limbs from this winter.  The ground, at least at the surface, is saturated right now, so no danger of the fire getting away, UNLESS the high winds from the south come sooner than predicted.

    If I can find something red to wear, I shall.  I have a green flannel shirt that I will certainly wear.  I am not a religious person in any sense of the word, but I do think that traditions that are older than written history have some meaning.

    Warmest regards,


  3. TMC

    or even believe in a “higher being” to practice the “old ways” and enjoy the connection with our “home”. The wheel of the seasons and time turn regardless of mythical beliefs.  

  4. Translator, aka Dr. David W. Smith

    I very much appreciate all of your kind support, for such a long time.

    Warmest regards,


  5. Translator, aka Dr. David W. Smith

    going well.  Youngest Son was almost busted for pot, but the former Mrs. Translator talked the police out of it.  They are both fried, and she does not need any more stress than she already has.  If I were a better husband and father, it would not have happened.  I do not know what to do.  I certainly am a failure.


  6. TMC

    that isn’t true and you don’t know that this would have not happened even if you had been there. Children do a lot of things that parents can’t control. Stop blaming yourself for things you can’t control. Your youngest son has his own mistakes to make. I know you probably did. I know I sure did and pot was the least of it.

    Lighten up on yourself.

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