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May 31 2015

Six In The Morning

On Sunday

 Kansas college student killed in mosque attack called a ‘hero

   

By Kevin Conlon and Greg Botelho, CNN

He was a Kansas college student who had returned home in order to get married.

And then after that, Abduljaleel Alarbash planned to leave Saudi Arabia and head back to Wichita State University, where the electrical engineering major was an honor roll student.

It appeared like it was nothing but good times ahead for “Jalil,” as his college buddies called him.

Until Friday, when the 22-year-old’s life was cut short by a suicide bomber outside of a mosque in Dammam in eastern Saudi Arabia.

ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack, its second on a Shiite mosque in as many weeks.

The blast also killed Jalil’s brother, Mohammed, and their cousin, Alarbash’s father, speaking in Arabic, said in a video posted Saturday.




Sunday’s Headlines:

Greece suffering as insecurity surrounding debt crisis kills businesses across the country

UN firms stance as peacekeeper child sex abuse allegations grow

 A Man in Full: To Hell and Back in the Chinese Healthcare System

IS group destroys notorious Syria prison as regime accused of barrel bomb killings

What does the Justice Dept. have on FIFA? A deep dive into the indictment. (+video)

  Greece suffering as insecurity surrounding debt crisis kills businesses across the country

It’s going to be a long summer for Greece

 Nathalie Savaricas Athens

The onset of warmer weather in Athens is usually accompanied by locals flooding the streets of their capital, shopping, eating and drinking out. This year, the shopfronts are empty. As insecurity surrounding Greece’s debt crisis grows, more and more small businesses are folding.

Since Syriza’s arrival in power, with its radical approach to debt negotiations, doubts have increased as to whether Athens can clinch a deal at all.

 UN firms stance as peacekeeper child sex abuse allegations grow

  The UN rights chief has urged France, Equatorial Guinea and Chad to investigate whether soldiers sexually abused children in the Central African Republic. The scandal has implicated UN’s peacekeeping mission to CAR.

 DW-DE

Rights chief Zeid Raad al-Hussein urged the countries to investigate whether troops they later assigned to UN missions sexually abused children. A six-page UN report details the alleged abuse by troops from France, Chad and Equatorial Guinea between December 2013 and June 2014 at a center for displaced people at M’Poko airport in the Central African Republic (CAR) capital, Bangui.

“In the wake of the revelations of alleged serious sexual abuse of children, currently under investigation by the French authorities, my office has taken a deeper look into these issues and the extent of the follow-up into alleged serious violations,” Hussein said in a statement.

  A Man in Full: To Hell and Back in the Chinese Healthcare System

     When a farmer and migrant worker got thrombosis in his legs, China failed him. In the end, he had to saw off his own rotting leg in order to survive. Zheng Yanliang’s story is an allegory of the struggle to modernize the Chinese healthcare system.

By Bernhard Zand

His shroud had already been purchased when, on April 14, 2012, Zheng Yanliang, 48, a Chinese man from Hebei Province, summoned up the last of his strength to lean out of his bed and reach for his toolbox. He took out a hacksaw. Then he wrapped the handle of a backscratcher in a piece of material, which he stuck in his mouth so that he could bite on it. He did not hesitate. He had thought about his options and concluded that he had only one choice, this unthinkable, monstrous deed. He placed the saw against his right leg, a hand’s breadth below his hip, and began to saw.

The life of worker Zheng Yanliang, which began in 1966, probably would have ended in 2012 were it not for a miracle. It’s a life that spans the entire period of China’s opening to the world, and of the great

IS group destroys notorious Syria prison as regime accused of barrel bomb killings

 

  Latest update : 2015-05-31

In neighbouring Iraq, government forces retook an area west of the city of Ramadi, which IS overran earlier in May.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said IS planted explosives that “largely destroyed” the Palmyra jail, which was for decades a symbol of abuses meted out on regime opponents.

Opponents of President Bashar al-Assad welcomed on social media the destruction of the long-feared prison at Palmyra, which IS seized 10 days ago after government forces pulled out.

In rebel-held areas of Aleppo province including the city itself, “at least 71 civilians were killed, and dozens wounded when regime helicopters dropped barrel bombs,” the Observatory said.

What does the Justice Dept. have on FIFA? A deep dive into the indictment. (+video)

  Here are five key takeaways from the allegations that US prosecutors hope will send some of the world’s most powerful and wealthy soccer officials to jail.

 By Dan Murphy, Staff writer

Earlier this week, a defiantly confident Sepp Blatter appeared all but certain to win a fifth term as FIFA president during today’s election in Zurich.

But then came the 164-page indictment issued Wednesday by the US Justice Department. The document presents exhaustive allegations about dozens of bribes that were either laundered through US financial institutions, affected the business of US entities, were negotiated on US soil, or all three.

What the allegations largely boil down to is a series of enrichment schemes between regional soccer officials, many of whom sat on FIFA’s executive committee, or exco, and private companies who were sold control of radio, television, and advertising rights to major soccer tournaments between 1991 and last year.