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Feb 23 2020

The Breakfast Club (Status Quo Establishment Toast)

Welcome to The Breakfast Club! We’re a disorganized group of rebel lefties who hang out and chat if and when we’re not too hungover we’ve been bailed out we’re not too exhausted from last night’s (CENSORED) the caffeine kicks in. Join us every weekday morning at 9am (ET) and weekend morning at 10:30am (ET) to talk about current news and our boring lives and to make fun of LaEscapee! If we are ever running late, it’s PhilJD’s fault.

AP’s Today in History for February 23rd

Iconic photo captured in Iwo Jima; Persian Gulf War begins in Kuwait; Scottish scientists clone first mammal; Stan Laurel dies; Carlos Santana wins 8 Grammy awards.

Breakfast Tune Europa

Something to think about, Breakfast News & Blogs below

 

“That’s Called Electability”: Diverse Coalition Propels Bernie Sanders to Big Win in Nevada
Jake Johnson, Common Dreams

“We have just put together a multi-generational, multi-racial coalition which is gonna not only win Nevada, it’s gonna to sweep this country,” Sanders said at a rally in San Antonio, Texas following his caucus victory.

Sanders wiped out the rest of the Democratic field among Latinos and young voters, according to entrance polling, and also won among middle-aged voters, voters with and without college degrees, men and women, voters from union and non-union households, and self-identified liberals and moderates.

The diversity of Nevada, said MSNBC’s Steve Kornacki, proved “to be Sanders’ strength.”

“What do you call it when you’re strong in every demographic group including age, race, and class? I think that’s called electability,” tweeted Sanders national press secretary Briahna Joy Gray.

 

 

Something to think about over coffee prozac

 
After Bernie Sanders’ landslide Nevada win, it’s time for Democrats to unite behind him
Nathan Robinson, The Guardian
 

Some members of the media establishment had no idea what to make of Sanders’ Nevada victory. On MSNBC, James Carville said that “Putin” had won Nevada, and Chris Matthews declared the primary “over” (ill-advisedly comparing Sanders’ victory to the Nazi invasion of France). Jennifer Rubin of the Washington Post admitted that Sanders had been stronger with nonwhite voters than she expected, and it might now be “too late” to do anything about him.

The other candidates and their supporters did their best to spin a humiliating defeat. Amy Klobuchar said her sixth-place finish “exceeded expectations”—if sixth place is better than you expected, you’re probably not a viable candidate. Biden vowed, implausibly (and for the third time) that he would bounce back. Pete Buttigieg took to the stage to denounce Sanders, who he said “believes in an inflexible, ideological revolution that leaves out most Democrats, not to mention most Americans.” A Warren supporter rather charmingly said that while Sanders had won, Warren had the “momentum,” and the Warren campaign itself said the Nevada “debate” mattered more than the Nevada “result.”

Democrats shouldn’t worry, though: Bernie has a strong organization and a lot of money, and can mobilize millions of people to support him in November. He’s exactly the kind of candidate you should want your party to have. And for all the fear of his “radicalism,” he’s really a moderate: his signature policies are a national health insurance program, a living wage, free public higher education, and a serious green energy investment plan. It’s shocking that there is such opposition to such sensible plans. On what planet are these things so politically toxic that Democrats are afraid to run on them? Voters like these ideas, and so long as Democrats unify behind Bernie rather than continuing to try to tear him down, they will have a very good shot at defeating a radical and unhinged president like Donald Trump. The polling looks good for Bernie in November, so now we just need to get this primary over with and focus on the real fight. The other candidates had their shot: they lost. They need to accept it.