Daily Archive: 11/11/2012

Nov 11 2012

Rant of the Week: Jon Stewart

Post Democalypse 2012 – America Takes a Shower

Karl Rove’s Math

Fox News Meltdown

Nov 11 2012

On This Day In History November 11

This is your morning Open Thread. Pour your favorite beverage and review the past and comment on the future.

Find the past “On This Day in History” here.

November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 50 days remaining until the end of the year.

World War I is commemorated on this day, commonly known as Remembrance Day. The ceasefire went into effect at 11:00am CET in 1918, the date of which (and sometimes the commemoration of) is known as Armistice Day. Veterans Day is an annual United States holiday honoring military veterans.

On this day in 1918, the armistice between the Allies and Germany was signed in a railway carriage in Compiegne Forest.

Clairière de l’Armistice

In November 1918 the Engineer in charge of the North Region Railways: Arthur-Pierre Toubeau, was instructed to find a suitably discreet place which would accommodate two trains. By coincidence on the outskirts of Compiègne in the forest of Rethondes lay an artillery railway emplacement. Set deep within the wood and out of the view of the masses the location was ideal.

Early in the morning of the 8th November a train carrying Maréchal Ferdinand Foch, his staff and British officers arrived on the siding to the right, nearest the museum. The train formed a mobile headquarters for Foch, complete with a restaurant car and office.

At 0700 hours another train arrived on the left hand track. One of the carriages had been built for Napoleon III and still bore his coat of arms. Inside was a delegation from the German government seeking an armistice.

There were only a hundred metres between the two trains and the entire area was policed by gendarmes placed every 20 metres.

For three days the two parties discussed the terms of an armistice until at 0530 hours on the 11th November 1918, Matthias Erzberger the leader of the German delegation signed the Armistice document.

Within 6 hours the war would be over.

Initially the carriage (Wagon Lits Company car No. 2419D) used by Maréchal Foch was returned to its former duty as a restaurant car but was eventually placed in the courtyard of the Invalides in Paris.

An American: Arthur Fleming paid for its restoration, and the wagon was brought back to Rethondes on 8th April 1927 and placed in a purpose built shelter (Since destroyed).

Numerous artifacts were obtained from those who had been involved in 1918 and the car was refurbished to its condition at the time of the Armistice.

At the entrance to the avenue leading down to the memorial site is a monument raised by a public subscription organised by the newspaper Le Matin.

The monument is dedicated to Alsace Lorraine and consists of a bronze sculpture of a sword striking down the Imperial Eagle of Germany it is framed by sandstone from Alsace.

The Clairière was inaugurated on 11th November 1922 by President Millerand.

Nov 11 2012

Remembrance Day

On 11 November at 5:00 am, an armistice with Germany was signed in a railroad carriage at Compiègne. At 11 am on 11 November 1918 – “the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” – a ceasefire came into effect. During the six hours between the signing of the armistice and its taking effect, opposing armies on the Western Front began to withdraw from their positions, but fighting continued along many areas of the front, as commanders wanted to capture territory before the war ended. Canadian Private George Lawrence Price was shot by a German sniper at 10:57 and died at 10:58. American Henry Gunther was killed 60 seconds before the armistice came into force while charging astonished German troops who were aware the Armistice was nearly upon them. The last British soldier to die was Pte George Edwin Ellison. The last casualty of the war was a German, Lieutenant Thomas, who, after 11 am, was walking towards the line to inform Americans who had not yet been informed of the Armistice that they would be vacating the buildings behind them.

Stanley KubrickPaths of Glory (1957) (1:27)

Nov 11 2012

Rememberance Day

On 11 November at 5:00 am, an armistice with Germany was signed in a railroad carriage at Compiègne. At 11 am on 11 November 1918 – “the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” – a ceasefire came into effect. During the six hours between the signing of the armistice and its taking effect, opposing armies on the Western Front began to withdraw from their positions, but fighting continued along many areas of the front, as commanders wanted to capture territory before the war ended. Canadian Private George Lawrence Price was shot by a German sniper at 10:57 and died at 10:58. American Henry Gunther was killed 60 seconds before the armistice came into force while charging astonished German troops who were aware the Armistice was nearly upon them. The last British soldier to die was Pte George Edwin Ellison. The last casualty of the war was a German, Lieutenant Thomas, who, after 11 am, was walking towards the line to inform Americans who had not yet been informed of the Armistice that they would be vacating the buildings behind them.

Stanley KubrickPaths of Glory (1957) (1:27)

Nov 11 2012

Educating Black Boys

Tony Harris takes a personal look at Baltimore’s inner city and an education system failing black Americans.

 Baltimore, Maryland has come to be known as ‘Charm City’ because of its harbour, which attracts a vibrant nightlife and thriving tourism business.

But just beyond the harbour’s calm waters is one of the toughest and most violent inner cities in the US.

Baltimore is also home to Al Jazeera presenter Tony Harris and in this episode of Al Jazeera Correspondent he takes us on an up close and personal journey to his old neighbourhood to witness the challenges facing black youth today as they struggle to get out of the dead end of life on inner city streets.

Most of the crime in Baltimore is committed by black males with other blacks as victims, making black males an easy target for the police.

And many believe that the stereotyping of black kids starts at an early age in the US – as early as grade school. In this film, Harris examines how the education system has failed black boys and reflects upon why he managed to make it out successfully while so many of his friends did not.

Nov 11 2012

Punting the Pundits: Sunday Preview Edition

Punting the Punditsis an Open Thread. It is a selection of editorials and opinions from around the news medium and the internet blogs. The intent is to provide a forum for your reactions and opinions, not just to the opinions presented, but to what ever you find important.

Thanks to ek hornbeck, click on the link and you can access all the past “Punting the Pundits”.

Follow us on Twitter @StarsHollowGzt

The Sunday Talking Heads:

Up with Chris Hayes: Joining Chris will be: Hakeem Jeffries, newly elected Congressman representing the 8th Congressional District in Brooklyn, New York State Assemblyman; Teresa Ghilarducci (@tghilarducci), labor economist and director of the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis at The New School; Edward Conard, former partner at Bain Capital from 1993-2007 and author of “Unintended Consequences: Why Everything You’ve Been Told About The Economy Is Wrong;” Ohio Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown; Neil Barofsky, former special inspector general in charge of oversight of TARP (Troubled Assets Relief Program); and Rober Wolf (@robertwolf32), former President of UBS Investment Bank, outside adviser to President Obama and host of “Impact Players,” a weekly webcast on Reuters’ YouTube channel.

This Week with George Stephanopolis: “This Week”‘s the guests are  Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash. and Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga.

The roundtable guests are Fox News anchor Greta van Susteren, Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., Rep. Donna Edwards, D-Md., The Wall Street Journal‘s Paul Gigot, and The Nation‘s Katrina vanden Heuvel.

Face the Nation with Bob Schieffer: Mr. Schieffer’s guest Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., will discuss what his party learned from Campaign 2012.

On joining on his panel are The Wall Street Journal‘s Peggy Noonan, Vanity Fair‘s Dee Dee Myers, Harvard University’s David Gergen and CBS News Political Director John Dickerson.

The Chris Matthews Show: This weeks guests are Kathleen Parker, The Washington Post Columnist; Bob Woodward, The Washington Post Associate Editor; Helene Cooper, The New York Times White House Correspondent; and David Ignatius, The Washington Post Columnist.

Meet the Press with David Gregory: On MTP the guest are Democratic Policy Committee Chairman Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and member of the “Gang of Six” during the debt ceiling debate, Sen. Tom Coburn (R-OK).

The roundtable guests are Rep.-elect Joaquìn Castro (D-TX); Republican strategist Steve Schmidt; presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin; Washington Post‘s Bob Woodward, and NBC News Political Director and Chief White House Correspondent Chuck Todd.

State of the Union with Candy Crowley: The web site had not yet listed the guests as of this post.

Nov 11 2012

Six In The Morning

On Sunday

Legal drugs, deadly outcomes

Prescription overdoses kill more people than heroin and cocaine.

An L.A. Times review of coroners’ records finds that drugs prescribed by a

small number of doctors caused or contributed to a disproportionate number of deaths.

BY SCOTT GLOVER, LISA GIRION. VIDEO AND PHOTOS BY LIZ O. BAYLEN

November 11, 2012

These six people died of drug overdoses within a span of 18 months. But according to coroners’ records, that was not all they had in common. Bottles of prescription medications found at the scene of each death bore the name of the same doctor: Van H. Vu.

After Finnila died, coroner’s investigators called Vu to learn about his patient’s medical history and why he had given him prescriptions for powerful medications, including the painkiller hydrocodone.

Investigators left half a dozen messages. Vu never called back, coroner’s records state.

Over the next four years, 10 more of his patients died of overdoses, the records show. In nine of those cases, painkillers Vu had prescribed for them were found at the scene.




Sunday’s Headlines:

South Africa loses faith with the ANC

Syria’s long search for peace

Drive for education drives South Korean families into the red

Are one in eight Australians really poor?

Leaders meet on military plan for Mali

Nov 11 2012

What We Now Know

Usually Up host Chris Hayes highlights important news that we may have missed in the avalanche of stories that hit us daily from the 24/7 news media, this week his show focused on the aftermath of  Tuesday’s election. His news story of the week focused on how the changing demographics of the American electorate and how the conservatives will continue to be on the losing side if they keep on turning their backs on minorities.

You can read the transcript here.

Tell us what you’ve learned this week. This is an Open Thread.