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Aug 03 2012

XXX Olympiad- Day 10

Broadcast Schedule

Time Network Sport Competitors
6:30 am Vs. Beach Volleyball elimination
7 am Vs. Women’s Football SWE v FRA
7 am Bravo Tennis (Men’s and Women’s Semifinal) all
8:30 am Vs. Women’s Volleyball JPN v RUS
9 am MS Men’s Gymnastics (Trampoline) all
9:30 am Vs. Women’s Football USA v NZL
10 am NBC Track & Field (Opening, Women’s 400m) all
10:30 am NBC Rowing (Men’s Pair, Single and Quadruple Sculls, Women’s Double Sculls) (Medals) all
10:30 am MS Women’s Water Polo RUS v AUS
10:30 am NBC Swimming (Men’s and Women’s 4x100m Medley, Men’s 1500m, Women’s 50m Free) all
11 am Vs. Archery (Men’s Individual Final) (Medal) all
11:30 am NBC Track & Field (Qualifying) all
11:30 am MS Women’s Handball RUS v BRA
noon NBC Beach Volleyball elimination
noon Vs. Women’s Football (Elimination) BRA v JPN
12:30 pm MS Women’s Water Polo ESP v HUN
1:30 pm Vs. Shooting (Medal) all
1:30 pm MS Equestrian (Team Dressage Day 2 Qualifying) all
2 pm NBC Swimming (Men’s and Women’s 4x100m Medley, Men’s 1500m, Women’s 50m Free) all
2:30 pm NBC Women’s Water Polo USA v CHN
2:30 pm Vs. Women’s Football (Elimination) GBR v CAN
2:30 pm MS Table Tennis (Women’s Team) USA v JPN
3:30 pm MS Badminton (Mixed Doubles Final) (Medal) CHN v CHN
3:30 pm NBC Rowing (Men’s Pair, Single and Quadruple Sculls, Women’s Double Sculls) (Medals) all
4 pm NBC Cycling (Track Cycling Final) (Medal) all
4 pm MS Beach Volleyball elimination
4 pm Vs. Weightlifting (Men’s) (Medal) all
4 pm NBC Track & Field (Medal) all
5 pm Vs. Women’s Basketball CZE v USA
5 pm CNBC Boxing (Men’s Fly and Welter Weight) elimination
7 pm Vs. Beach Volleyball elimination
8 pm NBC Prime Time (Men’s 100m Fly, Men’s Trampoline (finals), Track & Field, Diving, Women’s Volleyball (USA v SRB)) (Medals)
12:30 am NBC Late Night (Cycling (Track Final), Heptathalon, Women’s Discus) (Medal) all
1:30 am NBC Prime Time repeat
3 am CNBC Boxing repeats elimination
4 am Vs. Triathalon (Medal) all

All this is sourced through the NBC Olympics broadcast schedule.  Competition starts again at 6 am tomorrow.  

Competitions designated by (Medal) will award winners that day.  ‘all’ means not specified.  Sometimes NBC especially does mashups and doesn’t include event or competitor information.  Elimination means no round robin, one and done.

These schedules are a place for you to make sure you don’t miss a sport you like and share your observations.  Have fun today!

After Warnings of an Olympic Crush, Businesses Suffer in a Deserted London

By JOHN F. BURNS, The New York Times

Published: August 2, 2012

With the Games nearing the end of their first week, and 10 more days to go, there has been no sign of the normal tourist-inflated crush at this time of the year – much less the no-room-to-move congestion officials warned would come with huge throngs of Olympic visitors competing for space on London’s notoriously overcrowded roads and transit systems, and in its shops, theaters, museums, galleries and restaurants.



Jeremy Hunt, the culture and sport minister in the Cameron cabinet, said Thursday that people who saw the Olympics as an economic body blow were premature and taking too narrow a view. The government now acknowledges that there is unlikely to be any short-term boost from the Games. It has reassured those nervous about its outlay on the Games – put at about $15 billion by government officials and as high as $20 billion by some experts, with road, railway and other improvements factored in – that the expense will be recouped in the long term by a $20 billion boost in Britain’s trade.



Mayor Boris Johnson, one of the Games’ biggest boosters, has made a midcourse correction of his own. He has admitted that the instant Olympic bounce he once forecast for London’s economy has evaporated, replaced by a “patchy” performance across many important sectors. But holding out for a turnaround, he has said things could improve as people realize that London without the crowds has become an unusually inviting place to go.



Normally crowded sidewalks in areas like Knightsbridge, Oxford Street, Bond Street, Piccadilly and Soho have looked much as they do when the city empties for summer weekends. Tables at sidewalk cafes have gone begging, and tickets to the West End’s normally sold-out hit shows are readily available, often at 20 percent discounts.

Cabdrivers complain that business is down 30 percent from normal at this time of year. “Where are the million extra visitors that we were promised?” asked Steve McNamara, a spokesman for the Licensed Taxi Drivers’ Association. He coupled this with a palpable absence of the national pride Mr. Cameron has urged on a nation hosting its first Olympics since 1948. “I’m looking forward to the closing ceremony,” on Aug. 12, Mr. McNamara said.

Stores in the upscale West End shopping district have said sales are down by 10 percent and more, and restaurants used to turning people away are desperate for trade. Ricky McMenemy, managing director of the Rules restaurant in Covent Garden, popular with Americans for a menu specializing in traditional British foods, said that after a “disaster” last Friday, when diners stayed away to watch the opening ceremony, the restaurant was “seeing a 50 percent downturn” in diners this week. Hundreds of West End hotels that had advertised rooms at premium prices, in some cases five times the normal rate, have dropped prices back to the usual level or even offered heavy discounts.

Ha.  Ha.  Ha.  Brilliant!

A High-Profile Cheering Section for a Horse’s Olympic Debut

By MARY PILON, The New York Times

Published: August 2, 2012

Ann Romney, whose husband, Mitt, is the presumptive presidential candidate for the Republican party, was on hand as an owner of Rafalca, a 15-year-old mare.

Rafalca and her rider, the veteran equestrian Jan Ebeling, took the stage early and finished the opening round of their Olympic debut with a score of 70.243, placing 13th. They have to wait to see how the rest of the field fares Friday before knowing whether they will advance to the Grand Prix Special on Tuesday.

Well, people have asked.

The Goal Is Winning Gold, Not Winning Every Match

By SAM BORDEN, The New York Times

Published: August 2, 201

Derek Jeter is a career .313 hitter. And yet in certain situations, sometimes even important situations in important games, Jeter goes up to the plate with the intention of not getting a hit. If he is successful – that is, if he succeeds at failing – he will be congratulated by his teammates when he returns to the dugout. The rules of baseball and other sports create situations in which a type of failure can be good strategy.

In the badminton case, the teams’ ultimate goal was clear: win a gold medal. And what is one way to help do that? Avoid the best teams for as long as possible. This was not a sacrifice bunt because there was no sacrifice. The teams, after evaluating the tournament setup that was presented to them, saw an opportunity to give up nothing in the hope of gaining something significant. One could argue it would have been silly for them not to seize that opportunity.



On Tuesday in Cardiff, Wales, the Japanese women’s soccer team purposely played for a draw in its final group game, hanging back in the second half and never pushing forward to try to score. This strategy was ordered by the team’s coach, and his reasoning was simple: a draw meant his team would stay put and play its quarterfinal in the same city a few days later. A win meant the Japanese would have to travel to Scotland to play the knockout game.

To that coach, Norio Sasaki, less travel meant a better chance at winning the tournament. To those badminton players, a loss in the final group game meant the same. Fans who complained about having bought tickets to see something like that are not seeing the athletes’ big picture. The competitors’ main obligation is to do what sets them up best to win a medal. They trained to play well, yes, but more important, they trained to win a medal. And Tuesday, losing gave them the best chance to do that. If fans are still angry, they should be angry at the organizers who made the situation possible, not the athletes themselves.

At least someone agrees with me.

The Guardian interactive chart to see where Ye’s performance ranks against those of swimmers at similarly high profile competitions between 2010 and 2012.

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